Human Trafficking Institute Invited to Join Preeminent Anti-Trafficking Policy Group

By: JONATHAN ROBERTS

The Human Trafficking Institute recently became one of the newest members of the Alliance to End Slavery and Trafficking (ATEST), giving the Institute a stronger voice in U.S. Government policy solutions that bring traffickers to justice around the globe.

ATEST is a U.S.-based coalition that advocates for solutions to prevent and end all forms of human trafficking and modern slavery around the world. It is composed of member organizations that focus on different types of anti-trafficking work. Together, they collectively advocate for policies that “prevent labor and sex trafficking, hold perpetrators accountable, ensure justice for victims and empower survivors with tools for recovery.”

There are currently 12 member organizations, including Centro de los Derechos Migrante (CDM), Coalition of Immokalee Workers (CIW), Coalition to Abolish Slavery & Trafficking (CAST), Free the Slaves, National Network for Youth (NN4Y), Polaris, Safe Horizons, Solidarity Center, United Way Worldwide, Verite, and Vital Voices Global Partnership. ATEST advocates extensively on Capitol Hill; its policy priorities include increased funding for anti-trafficking work and reauthorization of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act.

“The Institute is looking forward to participating in the ATEST collation as it advances efforts to combat modern slavery,” said John Richmond, one of the Institute’s Founding Directors.

Annick Febrey, the Institute’s Director of Government and Corporate Relations, led the Institute’s application for membership effort in ATEST. She describes the coalition as the “preeminent anti-trafficking policy group in the U.S.”

“The coalition is unique in that it brings together groups that focus on children, adults, domestic, international, sex and labor trafficking all under one umbrella,” Febrey said. “With such varied experience, it takes a lot of work to reach consensus on what the right policy solutions are, but members of Congress and the Administration can be sure that when ATEST is advocating for a particular position or program, it’s something that’s supported by a wide swath of the trafficking community.”

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Jonathan Roberts

Jonathan Roberts

Prior to his role at the Institute, Jonathan was a Research Fellow at the Greater Mekong Research Center, a public policy think-tank in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. There, he conducted research on the political economy and development outlook of Southeast Asia. He is particularly interested in institutional reform and the rule of law in developing countries. Jonathan holds degrees from Seattle Pacific University and the Université Lumière Lyon II in France. He speaks English and French.