Suspected Traffickers Arrested and Charged in Two Cases in Uganda

By: KELLI L. ROSS

Trafficking cases continue to move through the justice pipeline in Uganda, where the Institute’s Special Counsel in Uganda Tyler Dunman is supporting of the work of police, prosecutors, and non-governmental partners in the country. In the midst of stay-at-orders, Dunman has continued to assist and advise government officials in the charging of traffickers and collecting of evidence. Here are updates from two cases he recently supported.

Case: Fraudulent Employment Scheme
Two suspected traffickers were arrested and charged with Trafficking in Persons after their fraudulent employment scheme was discovered by Ugandan police. Two young women were rescued and are now receiving aftercare from a partner civil society organization. After agreeing to a fabricated employment scheme orchestrated by the arrested suspects, the women were allegedly sexually exploited and abused. The Institute’s Special Counsel assisted in getting these two arrested suspects properly charged under Uganda’s Prevention of Trafficking In Persons Act. Ugandan media outlet CapitalFM reported on this case on May 29.

Case: Aggravated Trafficking in Children and Forced Child Marriage
A Portuguese national was arrested and charged with Aggravated Trafficking in Children after he was found trafficking a 16-year-old child. Uganda police learned the suspect was alleged to be harboring the victim and her family and forcing the child to engage in sexual exploitation. The child and her younger sister were both rescued and are now in the care of an aftercare partner organization. Police further learned the suspect was negotiating a forced child marriage with the 16-year-old victim. The Institute’s Special Counsel advised law enforcement on securing critical evidence in the case and worked with the prosecution team to effectively charge the suspect under Uganda’s Prevention of Trafficking In Persons Act. The Observer reported on this case on May 29.

About the author

Kelli serves as Chief of Staff and Director of Communications at the Human Trafficking Institute. Her background is in journalism, public relations and peacebuilding. Prior to joining the Institute, she was the Communications Officer / Special Assistant to the Executive Director at Lwala Community Alliance in Nashville, Tennessee. She has worked for the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Conflict and Stabilization Operations in Washington, D.C., directly supporting the Bureau’s Assistant Secretary; as director of communications for microfinance organization Five Talents in Vienna, Virginia; and as business reporter at The Jackson (TN) Sun. She has worked and studied in Kenya, South Sudan, Liberia, India, Peru, and Israel. Kelli holds a BA in communication arts from Union University and an MS in conflict analysis and resolution from George Mason University. She lives in Nashville, Tennessee.

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Kelli Ross

Kelli Ross

Kelli serves as Chief of Staff and Director of Communications at the Human Trafficking Institute. Her background is in journalism, public relations and peacebuilding. Prior to joining the Institute, she was the Communications Officer / Special Assistant to the Executive Director at Lwala Community Alliance in Nashville, Tennessee. She has worked for the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Conflict and Stabilization Operations in Washington, D.C., directly supporting the Bureau’s Assistant Secretary; as director of communications for microfinance organization Five Talents in Vienna, Virginia; and as business reporter at The Jackson (TN) Sun. She has worked and studied in Kenya, South Sudan, Liberia, India, Peru, and Israel. Kelli holds a BA in communication arts from Union University and an MS in conflict analysis and resolution from George Mason University. She lives in Nashville, Tennessee.