Inaugural Douglass Fellows Class Celebrated at Lincoln’s Cottage in Washington, DC

By: KELLI L. ROSS The Institute’s first class of Douglass Fellows completed their nine-month fellowship with a celebration dinner on April 18 at Lincoln’s Cottage in Washington, DC. The seven Fellows, representing six law schools, were engaged in the Institute’s anti-trafficking work through three key components: (1) Research & Writing; (2) Advocacy; and (3) Mentorship. … Continue reading Inaugural Douglass Fellows Class Celebrated at Lincoln’s Cottage in Washington, DC

#InContext: Abraham Lincoln

By: MEGAN ABRAMEIT When looking at Abraham Lincoln’s portrait in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C., one will notice a few unique features. He is portrayed neither as glorious or powerful like the colorful George Washington portrait but is sitting in his chair, leaning forward with his elbow on his knee, in a position … Continue reading #InContext: Abraham Lincoln

#InContext: Frederick Douglass

Frederick Douglass was a well-respected abolitionist, social activist, orator, and statesman. Born into slavery in Maryland in 1818, his story is one of overcoming oppression in order to pave the way for others to do the same. All three of his autobiographies, from Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass in 1845 to The Life … Continue reading #InContext: Frederick Douglass

#InContext: Pope John Paul II

By: SUTTON ROACH Karol J. Wojtyla, known as Saint Pope John Paul II, was raised in a small Polish town during the anti-Semitism period. A faithful Catholic, Karol rejected the segregation of Jews and took on a special love for the Jewish people, referring to them as “our elder brothers.” Karol enrolled in Jagiellonian University … Continue reading #InContext: Pope John Paul II

#InContext: Dwight D. Eisenhower

By: TAKIM WILLIAMS The Cold War was in full swing when Dwight D. Eisenhower was elected president of the United States for the second time. Soviet tanks had violently smothered Hungarian protesters months before the election, which Eisenhower mentions in his second inaugural address in January 1957, “Budapest is no longer merely the name of … Continue reading #InContext: Dwight D. Eisenhower

#InContext: Theodore Parker & Martin Luther King Jr.

The Selma to Montgomery March of 1965 occurred the year after the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which did far less to improve the lives of oppressed African Americans than many of them had hoped. In King’s own words at the march, “The Civil Rights Act of 1964 gave Negroes some part of their rightful … Continue reading #InContext: Theodore Parker & Martin Luther King Jr.

#InContext: The Emancipation Proclamation

On January 1, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation as the United States neared its third year of civil war. The proclamation declared “that all persons held as slaves” within the rebellious states “are, and henceforward shall be free.” Click here to read the entire Proclamation. Until that point, the North and South … Continue reading #InContext: The Emancipation Proclamation