Inaugural Douglass Fellows Class Celebrated at Lincoln’s Cottage in Washington, DC

By: KELLI L. ROSS The Institute’s first class of Douglass Fellows completed their nine-month fellowship with a celebration dinner on April 18 at Lincoln’s Cottage in Washington, DC. The seven Fellows, representing six law schools, were engaged in the Institute’s anti-trafficking work through three key components: (1) Research & Writing; (2) Advocacy; and (3) Mentorship. … Continue reading Inaugural Douglass Fellows Class Celebrated at Lincoln’s Cottage in Washington, DC

#InContext: Abraham Lincoln

By: MEGAN ABRAMEIT When looking at Abraham Lincoln’s portrait in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C., one will notice a few unique features. He is portrayed neither as glorious or powerful like the colorful George Washington portrait but is sitting in his chair, leaning forward with his elbow on his knee, in a position … Continue reading #InContext: Abraham Lincoln

#InContext: Ida B. Wells

By: CORY SAGDUYU Ida B. Wells, an early leader in the Civil Rights Movement, devoted her life to shining light on the darkness of injustice. In 1862, Wells was born a slave in Holly Springs, Mississippi. The Emancipation Proclamation officially freed slaves in the South about six months later, and Wells devoted her life to … Continue reading #InContext: Ida B. Wells

#InContext: Ta-nehisi Coates

By: TAKIM WILLIAMS The experience of a trafficking victim is largely unaffected by statements written in their government’s database. Likewise, slavery did not end in the United States after it was outlawed by the Emancipation Proclamation and the 13th Amendment. According to the Slavery Convention of 1926, slavery is “the status or condition of a … Continue reading #InContext: Ta-nehisi Coates

#InContext: Frederick Douglass

Frederick Douglass was a well-respected abolitionist, social activist, orator, and statesman. Born into slavery in Maryland in 1818, his story is one of overcoming oppression in order to pave the way for others to do the same. All three of his autobiographies, from Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass in 1845 to The Life … Continue reading #InContext: Frederick Douglass

#InContext: Harriet Tubman

By: TAKIM WILLIAMS Harriet Tubman escaped from slavery in 1849. She made her way from her Maryland plantation to the city of Philadelphia, where she was able to find work and save money. Yet she was not satisfied by her own freedom. She returned to Maryland to escort her sister to the North. Then, she … Continue reading #InContext: Harriet Tubman

#InContext: Theodore Parker & Martin Luther King Jr.

The Selma to Montgomery March of 1965 occurred the year after the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which did far less to improve the lives of oppressed African Americans than many of them had hoped. In King’s own words at the march, “The Civil Rights Act of 1964 gave Negroes some part of their rightful … Continue reading #InContext: Theodore Parker & Martin Luther King Jr.

#InContext: William Lloyd Garrison

By: TAYLOR HUSE William Lloyd Garrison stands in the back office of the Anti-Slavery headquarters listening to the crescendo of sound emanating from the men gathered outside, murmurs punctuated by intermittent shouts of racial epithets and sarcastic cheers. Through the window, Garrison sees the mob part for the ladies, white and black, of the Boston … Continue reading #InContext: William Lloyd Garrison

#InContext: The Emancipation Proclamation

On January 1, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation as the United States neared its third year of civil war. The proclamation declared “that all persons held as slaves” within the rebellious states “are, and henceforward shall be free.” Click here to read the entire Proclamation. Until that point, the North and South … Continue reading #InContext: The Emancipation Proclamation